381-8 Old Riverhead Road

Westhampton Beach, NY

Tel. 631-998-0780

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9am to 5pm / Sat. By Appointment / Sun. Closed

Our Company Blog

Fireplace Safety Tips

Even when you use your fireplace less in the warmer weather, there are still things to remember. In fact, using your fireplace less may make you more lax when it comes to fireplace safety. Your fireplace is still the focal point of your living space, and you still may choose to use it for ambiance and supplemental heat during the spring. Fire safety should always be the #1 priority when you have a fireplace in your home.

When the Fire is Out

When there isn’t a fire burning in the fireplace, it’s important to remember it is still dangerous. If there are children or guests with children in the home, they should use caution while playing near the hearth, even when there is no fire lit.

-Treat the fireplace as if there is a fire burning in it.
-Keep the fireplace screen up and properly installed.
-Close doors securely and check the hinges and latches regularly.
-Keep the damper closed when a fire is not burning to prevent animal intrusion that may cause damage and obstruction.

When the Fire is Burning

When you’re ready to light a fire in your spring fireplace, it can be tricky. The air becomes more warm and humid during spring, making it more difficult to light a fire. Only burn properly seasoned firewood in your fireplace.

When Burning Fires Outside

Spring is a popular time to open your outdoor fire pit for the season. Depending on the style of fire pit you might have in your outdoor space, you may not be worried about fire safety. However, when a fire is burning, fire safety should be a concern!

-Never leave a fire unattended.
-Keep children away from the fire.
-Only burn wood and kindling in your fire. Leaves, pine cones/needles, and paper can float away and cause a fire elsewhere.
-Fill a bucket of water and keep it nearby in case of emergency.
-Use proper, long-handled tools to stir the fire.
-Use long-handled spears for roasting marshmallows and hot dogs to avoid burns.
-Roast marshmallows over embers instead of flames in order to avoid a torch-like fire.
-When putting your fire out, spread out the embers and sprinkle water to avoid hot embers spraying when you dump a large amount of water.

It is always important to know your fire appliance. If you use your appliance improperly, it may be unsafe and you don’t realize it. Read your owner’s manual if you never have and make sure you know how it’s designed to work. You may need to cover your fire pit or do something special to prevent damage that can make it malfunction before you use it again.

When you buy your outdoor products from Beach Stove and Fireplace you will receive your manual and the expert advice of our technicians. Are you thinking about a fire pit and don’t know where to start? Start at Beach Stove and Fireplace! Call 631-998-0780 or come by our showroom!

By Julie Dismore on April 23rd, 2018 | Tagged with: Tags: , , | Leave a Comment

Make a Stylish Statement with a New Fireplace

Before you close out your chimney system for the off-season, pay attention to how it’s working and what you’d like to change next year. Installing a new fireplace this spring can mean a new fuel-type for next year, more heat output, higher efficiency, and better safety features. Whether you’re looking to replace an old fireplace, upgrade and update your living space with a new fireplace, or bring up your property value for a sale or refinancing, you can choose a stylish new fireplace to get the job done.

Fireplace Without the Chimney

You may decide to install a fireplace for the ambiance, supplemental heat, or style. There are many great and beautiful options at Beach Stove and Fireplace. We sell and install gas, pellet, and wood stoves and factory-made chimneys. Our fireplace experts can also show you many great options that don’t require a chimney. Vent-free gas log sets, stoves, and direct gas inserts don’t require a major construction. Stoves are a popular option because they can be free-standing and vented through the wall, ceiling, or floor.

Fireplace Inserts

Installing a fireplace insert is a popular option for new homeowners and home sellers because it is a quick and easy way to beautify an old masonry fireplace. Hiring Beach Stove and Fireplace to install your new fireplace insert means the job is done right, the fireplace is safe and ready for use, and you can enjoy a stylish new hearth all summer. Even when the fire isn’t lit, the fireplace is the focal point of the room it’s in. We sell gas, pellet, and wood-burning inserts that come in a variety of styles and colors, and that are efficient and eco-friendly.

Fireplace Face-Lift

There are plenty of fireplaces that work perfectly well while being an eyesore. You don’t have to spend money on a new appliance in order to have a new, stylish fireplace. Our technicians at Beach Stove and Fireplace can take a look at your fireplace and create an upgrade plan that will revitalize it in no time. Some popular ways to update an old fireplace is to add custom glass doors which also raises efficiency. Our sister company, Guaranteed Chimney Service, completes masonry re-facing in which you can choose the new brick, design, and pattern.

It may be that you aren’t aware of the options for a new fireplace. An expert who is CSIA-certified and who has field experience like our technicians can do almost anything with your fireplace. Visit our showroom to find deals and expert advice.

Starting the process now can mean your new fireplace is ready to use this spring. You can save money by shutting down the furnace and using a fireplace.

Call 631-998-0780 today!

By Julie Dismore on April 9th, 2018 | Tagged with: Tags: , , | Leave a Comment

Maintaining Your Wood Burning Stove or Fireplace

It is essential to properly maintain a wood burning appliance – whether it’s a stove or fireplace- to ensure the safety of your home and efficiency of the unit. Hiring a certified professional annually is your best bet, as they can assist in vital maintenance of your chimney, fireplace, or stove before you need it most. The best time to have your appliance inspected and cleaned is right before wintertime, when it will be at highest use.

Below are some tips to consider to properly care for your solid fuel appliance:

Removing ash, soot, and debris

Maintaining your wood burning stove or fireplace - Westhampton Beach NY - Beach Stove and Fireplace

Before you begin using your wood burning appliance more often, it’s important to clear all of the old debris from the inside of the unit. A vacuum cleaner can assist in getting all of the material out – just be sure that all of the debris is completely cool first. If your appliance has an ash pot or tray, be sure to remove this and empty it.

By Julie Dismore on December 29th, 2015 | Tagged with: Tags: , , | Leave a Comment

Proper Ash Disposal

Disposing of ash is a necessary evil that comes with enjoying a lovely fire at the end of a long day. The burning wood results in a pile of byproduct that needs to be removed in order to be able to continually use your fireplace or stove. Let us walk you through the proper way to remove and dispose of ash, and how often you need to do it to ensure a safe environment. Your plants will thank you!

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After a certain amount of burning, some of the ash needs to be removed, but a little of it can actually help. The Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) says that having an inch or so of ash under the grate will protect and encourage heat in the coals and result in more heat being produced. This can only be a good thing during the upcoming cold. It takes balance though. Too much ash will do the opposite to the coals, dispersing heat and not insulating the coals. Protecting the firebox is beneficial, but ash overload is where the trouble starts. The ash accumulation could spill over into the floor and singe or burn the flammable materials nearby.

Wait an entire 24 hours before attempting disposal. Ash that may look fine to touch won’t fully be cool until then. If you are unsure or in a time crunch, using heat resistant gloves will be your best bet to not burn yourself. Wearing your gloves, slowly remove the ash from the firebox until all that remains is larger coals that can be relit and about an inch of residual ash. The ash can be put in a bucket or sealed crate until cool, but put the container out of harms reach, in a closet or rarely used pantry. The temptation would be too great for small children or animals. If the ash is still warm, cover the pile in sand or cover with a lid of some sort to keep oxygen out. This will starve out any flame that may be tempted to develop.

Once your ash bucket has been removed from eyesight, forget about it. Wait three days and then uncover it. Relocate the cooled ash to a bag of some sort and put in the garbage. If your garden could use more alkaline soil, sprinkling some ash onto the plants could be very beneficial. Don’t dump the whole bucket though, you don’t want to shock your plants by completely changing the soil pH.

Ash is very alkaline, so too much will change the pH of the soil, and will end up killing your plants. If dumping the remaining ash seems wasteful, there are many other alternative uses as well. Our favorite is using ash instead of salt on slippery surfaces during the winter months to melt ice without damaging your soil!

Give us a call with any questions you have about your chimney or fireplace and make sure to have us out to sweep and inspect before the harsh winter sets in!

Carbon Monoxide Is Odorless, Colorless & Deadly

Carbon monoxide is one of the most dangerous gasses that people are exposed to…right in their own homes! Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless, and tasteless gas produced as a by-product of your home heating system. When not properly directed outside your home via your venting system and chimney, the gas causes often misinterpreted aliments and can even result in fatalities. That’s why it is so important to have a yearly chimney professional inspect, clean, and make any necessary repairs to your chimney, it’s lining, venting, and masonry. Beach Stove and Fireplace is here to provide those services for you.

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Sign/Symptoms/Warnings of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Many people may not attribute or recognize that the headaches, nausea, dizziness, tiredness, weakness, irritability, and trouble seeing clearly may be caused by toxic fumes leaking into their houses rather than being properly vented outside. And of course, as the concentration of carbon monoxide increases, so does the severity of its effects. According to the Center for Disease Control, over 20,000 people have to go to the emergency room due to the effects of carbon monoxide; 4000 people are poisoned so severely that they need hospitalization; and sadly, over 400 people die each year from toxic gas poisoning.

Causes of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

The most common and frightening reason for carbon monoxide poisoning is accidental exposure. Leaking and malfunctioning fuel burning appliances including furnaces, fireplaces, stoves, water heaters, gas and kerosene room heater all contribute to releasing the toxic fumes into your home and most of the time you don’t even realize it.

Today’s homes are built more airtight than ever in order to be more energy efficient. But, when heating systems are not properly vented outside, there is not enough fresh air in your home to dissipate the toxic gas and you, your family, and pets continue to breathe contaminated air. Those same poorly sealed window, doors, roofs, and attic that once drove up your utility costs also compensated by allowing the toxic fumes to escape.

The Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA) explains it further, “Manufacturers have designed new, high-technology heating appliances whose greater efficiency helps us save money, conserve natural resources and decrease environmental pollution. However, the new breed of high-efficiency gas and oil furnaces – when vented in to existing chimney flues – often do not perform at an optimum level. The differences in performance create conditions that allow toxic gases to more easily enter home living spaces.”

Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

According to CSIA, “When gas and oil burn in vented heating systems – in order to produce household heat – the dangerous fumes that are by-products of combustion range from soot to nitrogen dioxide to acidic water vapors. None of these pollutants should be allowed to leak from the chimney into your living space.

In addition to carrying off toxic gases, chimneys also create the draft (flow of air) that provides the proper air and fuel mixture for efficient operation of the heating appliance. Unfortunately, many chimneys in daily use in homes throughout the country either are improperly sized or have conditions that make them unable to perform their intended function.”

Every homeowner should review the guidelines provided by the Chimney Safety Institute of America to learn more about preventing carbon monoxide poisoning.

Yearly Inspections & Cleanings

CSIA, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, National Fire Protection Association, the EPA, and the American Lung Association are just a few of the many organizations that encourage homeowners to have a yearly cleaning and inspection of your chimney, flue, fireplace, and household venting (including your clothes dryer venting) by a trained and CSIA certified technician/chimney sweep.
The consequences of toxic fume poisoning, and fire risks justify the related cost of prevention.

Fire Safety for Fireplace Owners

A fireplace can add impressive beauty and comfort to a home, particularly during the chilly winter months. Few can resist the allure of the crackling flames and soothing warmth, which makes fireplaces such popular additions to home. However, they come with their own set of risks, just like all other household appliances. Keeping safety in mind this season can help ensure a warm, happy winter for everyone.

First of all, fireplaces are built to contain live flames that can burn upward of hundreds of degrees depending on the type of fuel being burned. In just a moment of contact with flames, skin can suffer severe burns and flammable materials can ignite violently. One good measure to take to help avoid this type of damage is to maintain a safe distance of at least three feet from the fireplace. This concerns both people and combustible items in the home, such as furniture and decorations. To help maintain this distance, the fire should remain supervised at all times, especially with children or pets around.

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Children and pets are at the highest risk around the fireplace. In addition to close supervision, another way to keep them safe is to have heat resistant glass doors installed on the face of the fireplace. Designed to separate the home from the fire, the newer models of glass doors even stay cool to the touch while the fire burns, making them an ideal safety feature. For older children, teach them about fire safety, including the risk of burns and the danger of putting foreign objects into the fire.

Another crucial step to take to keep the fireplace safe is to have it serviced regularly. Fire code requires the chimney be swept at least once per year. This practice removes built up soot or creosote, which can block the proper ventilation of fumes from the home or even cause a devastating chimney fire. Additionally, an inspection must be performed annually to detect any potential safety threats like an obstruction, a damaged flue lining, or a malfunctioning damper, all of which can flood the house with poisonous carbon monoxide gas.

One final measure, which should be present in a house whether or not it has a fireplace, is the proper placement of functioning smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke detectors should be placed on each floor, outside the sleeping area, and inside each bedroom. Carbon monoxide detectors should also be on each floor and outside the sleeping area. Each detector should be replaced every five to ten years, depending on the manufacturer’s requirements, and the batteries must be tested every month and replaced if necessary.

For more tips on being safe with your fireplace this winter, contact the professionals at Beach Stove and Fireplace.

Keeping Water out of Your Chimney and Fireplace

Perhaps the best thing you can do to extend the life of your fireplace, wood stove, and chimney is to keep water out of it. As you can imagine, because of its location, there is no part of your home that is as subject to driving rains and wind pressure as your chimney. Of course, condensation may also cause water to collect within your chimney, and chimneys are especially vulnerable to condensation because water vapor is a component of flue gases.

Water is one of the most important substances on earth. All plants and animals must have water to live. Your chimney, on the other hand, can be destroyed by water intrusion.

Water is one of the most important substances on earth. All plants and animals must have water to live. Your chimney, on the other hand, can be destroyed by water intrusion.

Water can get into even the tiniest cracks and go on to wreak the worst havoc on your chimney—damaging everything from the top of your chimney (cap or damper) on down (mortar crown, flashing), and into your chimney’s interior (liner) and finally reaching your heating appliance. This is why your chimney requires an annual inspection. Each year a professional needs to check it for leaks, blockages, and damaged components.

Help—There’s Water in My Fireplace!

If you find water in your fireplace or stove, something is wrong. Likewise, if you hear the sound of rainwater dripping down your chimney, your chimney and heating system need attention. Never attempt use a fireplace or stove that appears to be collecting water. It is no longer safe for use.

Both gas and wood-burning stoves and fireplaces, as well as outdoor hearths, will show signs of premature age because of water exposure. Water has also been shown to greatly compromise the efficiency and safety of these appliances.

There are a number of ways to keep water out of your fireplace and to prevent it from entering in the future, including:

  • Installation of a chimney cap or top-sealing damper
  • Repair of faulty chimney crown or chimney flashing
  • Masonry repair to remedy hairline cracks, incompletely filled mortar joints, and other flaws
  • Professional masonry waterproofing

Located in Westhampton Beach, New York, Beach Stove and Fireplace can be counted on to install your fireplace or stove correctly so that you can enjoy it with complete confidence. We’ll also make sure that you have all the needed components to keep water out of your appliance so that it will perform well for you for the long haul and be eligible for any applicable warranties. Contact us today.

Chimney Maintenance — What You Need to Know


Whether you are purchasing a home with a working chimney or wanting to use your current fireplace when the weather gets cooler, there are some basic maintenance tips for ensuring safety and efficiency.Chimney Maintenance Image - Westhampton NY - Beach Stove and Fireplace

  • Your chimney should be inspected and cleaned annually. This ensures that the chimney is structurally intact and ready to use safely.
  • When scheduling your chimney cleaning and inspection, only use NCSG (National Chimney Sweep Guild) certified chimney sweeps.
  • Regardless of how often your chimney and fireplace have been used, the fireplace and chimney still need a thorough cleaning prior to the new season. Some prefer to have them cleaned in the spring (stating the benefit of having the creosote buildup removed and avoiding any musty smells over a hot summer), while others recommend an early autumn cleaning (this will ensure that any birds or debris that may have gotten into the chimney during the spring and summer will be removed before the fireplace and chimney get going).
  • Never use the chimney unless the damper is fully open.
  • Creosote is a substance created by flue gas residue and unburned wood particles. It is highly combustible and any buildup that isn’t removed makes your chimney and home at risk for a chimney fire.
  • Never burn trash or plastics in your chimney. This can also add to the buildup in your chimney.
  • A chimney cap can prevent water, debris, and animals from getting into your chimney. If you do not have one installed, consult with a certified sweep to determine the best cap for you chimney. This is a preventative measure designed to help keep your chimney free of contaminants.
  • Chimney Swifts are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty. If a swift makes its home in your chimney, it cannot be removed until the birds migrate south for the winter. Consult a professional sweep about dealing with Chimney Swifts.
  • You should use some type of fireplace screen when your fireplace is in use. This can prevent embers from inadvertently escaping the fireplace as well as prevent children and animals from reaching into the fire.
  • Your chimney has a protective liner inside of it. These lines can be made from a variety of materials, such as stainless steel and clay. The liner should be checked periodically to ensure structural integrity. The liner protects the inside of the chimney from intense heat which can damage the chimney.

Responsibly using a chimney means not skipping annual check-ups. Your fireplace will heat more proficiently and you can feel more secure when you build your first fire of the season.

By Julie Dismore on July 18th, 2013 | Tagged with: Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment

Our Location

Beach Stove and Fireplace is located on Old Riverhead Road between Montauk Highway and Sunrise Highway. From Sunrise Highway take exit 63 south, travel 1.2 miles and turn right at the 381 complex (just north of Gabreski Airport)